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Danlami ALIYU

Soup Bowl C1833 Danlami ALIYU
Soup Bowl
C1833
Teapot C1832 Danlami ALIYU
Teapot
C1832
Soup Bowl C1834 Danlami ALIYU
Soup Bowl
C1834
Plate C1835 Danlami ALIYU
Plate
C1835
Jug C1831 Danlami ALIYU
Jug
C1831
Mug C1825 Danlami ALIYU
Mug
C1825
Mug C1826 Danlami ALIYU
Mug
C1826
Jug C1827 Danlami ALIYU
Jug
C1827
Jug C1828 Danlami ALIYU
Jug
C1828
Jug C1829 Danlami ALIYU
Jug
C1829
Jug C1830 Danlami ALIYU
Jug
C1830
Plate C1836 Danlami ALIYU
Plate
C1836
Jar and stopper C1837 Danlami ALIYU
Jar and stopper
C1837
Bottle with stopper C1838 Danlami ALIYU
Bottle with stopper
C1838
 C1695 Danlami ALIYU

C1695

Dates: 1952-2012

Born in Minna in Northern Nigeria, he first went to the Pottery Training Centre at Abuja (now Suleja) in 1966 when he was just 14. The centre was set up in 1951 by the British colonial government under Michael Cardew. Danlami started as a houseboy but in due course began to learn pottery and showed ability to make the forms of functional pottery first developed by Cardew .  In those years Michael OBrien, who had taken over from Cardew, was trying to make the production more cost effective.  Such studio pottery had a limited market in Nigeria although some of the potters including Michael Cardew and the Nigerian,  Ladi Kwali, had a considerable international reputation.  From 1970 Danlami worked at Jos Museum Pottery, a project set up to give recognition to traditional Nigerian pots. Danlami furthered his pottery development by periods spent in the UK.  In 1975 he spent a year at Michael Cardew’s pottery at Wenford Bridge and, between 1976-1979, he studied pottery and photography at Farnham School of Art.  His work was always appreciated by collectors in the UK and he had a very successful exhibition at the Commonwealth Institute in 1977.  In 1979 he returned to Nigeria and set up a government-funded pottery at Minna backed by OBrien and aspiring to the Cardew stoneware tradition however later at Al Habib Pottery he also developed work more adapted to Nigerian taste and economy decorating lower fired earthenware pottery with commercial paints. He was Muslim and had two wives and fifteen children in a period when the economic situation in Nigeria became increasingly challenging for his pottery production.  He continued to visit the UK making work at O Brien’s pottery in Surrey and exhibiting in London.

 

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